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bryan
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Date of reg.: 26.06.2018
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     The largest city in Malawi, Blantyre, was founded by Scottish missionaries in 1876. Almost a hundred years from its foundation, Blantyre developed as a city of European settlers. Up until the 60s of the twentieth century, due to racial segregation in Malawi, the indigenous population did not have the right to settle in Blantyre.

     A township of indigenous Malawians originated in 1909, seven miles southeast of Blantyre. At first it was a very small settlement with one store, and the owner of this store was from the Yao tribe, which is mainly from Mangochi. This man's name was Chelimbe, and he wrote his name on the store. The settlement became be called by the name of the store. Over time, the store did not become, and Chelimbe imperceptibly turned into Limbe, because such the name is just easier to pronounce.

     Both Blantyre and Limbe grew, until they finally merged with each other. The official administrative merger of Blantyre and Limbe took place in 1956. Now Limbe is an area in the southeast of Blantyre, nevertheless Limbe continues to be a kind of an independent city, because Limbe is not like Blantyre.

     The name of ship defines its way. The name of the town, taken from the name of the store, mysteriously determined its fate. Limbe is the trading capital of Malawi. In Limbe there are about a dozen shopping centers, there are many different kinds of shops. There is a market surrounded by a huge flea market, dotted with shops of small businessmen and artisans.

     Limbe has dense layout and little greenery. There are two main streets with one-way traffic, going in the direction of north - south and separated from each other by a distance of the several buildings. These are Livingstone Avenue (traffic towards Blantyre) and Churchill Road (traffic from Blantyre).

     Limbe, Livingstone Avenue. Early morning, not crowded:

Livingstone Avenue in Limbe

Livingstone Avenue in Limbe

Livingstone Avenue in Limbe

     Midday, center of Limbe, Livingstone Avenue:

Livingstone Avenue in Limbe

     Churchill Road:

Churchill Road in Limbe

Churchill Road in Limbe

     A lane between Livingstone Avenue and Churchill Road:

Limbe

     The flea market in Limbe is large-scale. It has an area comparable to that of a dozen football fields. The majority of merchants occupy old containers or stalls and shelters made by themselves from improvised materials.

     You can get to the flea market by moving from the center of Limbe to the west along James Street. Drive there will not succeed, have to go on foot. Shopping arcades start right away from Livingstone Avenue:

James Street in Limbe

James Street in Limbe

     The flea market in Limbe, James Street:

The flea market in Limbe

The flea market in Limbe

     View of James Street:

Limbe

Limbe

     Inside the flea market:

The flea market in Limbe

     In the southern part of Limbe, Livingstone Avenue ends (or rather, it starts here from merging with Churchill Road), and Churchill Road, becoming two-way, runs another half a kilometer further south. There are few buildings, many vacant lots and large trees:

Churchill Road in Limbe

     Road junction and the Limbe border. This is the end of Churchill Road; after the roundabout, other roads will start (Thyolo Road and Midima Road):

The roundabout in Limbe

     Sculptural group of two Chambo fish:

Sculptural group of two chambo fish in Limbe

     The fish at the roundabout is an advertisement for Chambo Fisheries company. Chambo is a fish breed that lives only in Lake Malawi, its meat has a sweet, delicious taste. Chambo fish is one of the symbols of Malawi. Today, the number of Chambo in Lake Malawi has dramatically decreased due to its industrial fishing. Chambo fisheries is a company that breeds Chambo in man-made reservoirs. Production areas of the company are located close to the south of Limbe. Chambo fisheries produces hundreds of tons of Chambo food fish per year.

        
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